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COVID Diaries: The Products of COVID

Free webinar: The products, services, websites and apps that are helping people adapt to the COVID era, with dscout founder and CEO Michael Winnick.

Featuring Michael Winnick, Jaymie Wahlen

Join dscout founder and CEO Michael Winnick for an exclusive first look at dscout's latest research surrounding the COVID pandemic: the products and services that are helping people adapt.

Michael and dscout's VP of Customer Success, Jaymie Wahlen, relay insight around the following themes:

  • The new household supply chain
  • Virtual human connection

Transcript:

Ben Wiedmaier:
What's up everybody? It's Ben from dscout. We're very excited for you to be joining COVID Diaries Part 3 with us today. I am Ben, as I think the name can say there. Ben from dscout. Thank you, Jaymie. I am the Evangelist at dscout. We were just joking earlier, that's the title that you throw for a cartoon character like me. I'm pleased to have on this webinar my esteemed colleagues and dare I say, friends, Jaymie Wahlen who's the VP of Customer Success at dscout. Her team is packed with researchers, strategists, and thinkers who help our customers make the best use of and translate their research for the dscout platform. And then we have the founder and CEO of dscout, Michael Winnick, joining us as well. I think we'll get started Jaymie, Michael, take it away.

Michael Winnick:
Okay. Sounds good. Jaymie you want to give a quick intro or should I just dive right in?

Jaymie Wahlen:
Sure. Yeah. I think Ben gave us a good intro but. My name is Jaymie Wahlen. I head up the team of research advisors at dscout. Hopefully, you know some familiar names on our team of research advisors. Kylie, Elizabeth, Emily, Charles, Tim, some really great folks there that collaborate with our clients every day, help their research be successful. So we really pride ourselves on making sure we're experts in all things dscout and so internal passion projects like the COVID Diaries are a really fun chance for us to practice and push ourselves and kind of flex those muscles. So I want to thank you all for sharing some time with us today, I know things are crazy out there, so thank you for sharing some of your time with us.

Michael Winnick:
Right. Jaymie and I have been partners on this journey, as we have been kind of doing the COVID Diaries work. So I'm Michael. I'm the CEO and founder of dscout and have effectively been a member of our research team, really, since COVID kind of started to heat up, so I've been heavily involved in a lot of the work with Jaymie and many other people in dscout and excited to have a chance to talk with you about that research and share some of our findings with you all today. And lastly, would also like to mention that I think it's great to spend time with so many researchers from organizations that are having an incredibly positive impact on people's lives right now in a time where it really, really matters. So, let's move forward.

Michael Winnick:
So we're going to go through the COVID Diaries, a little bit about methodology and some backstory on this project. We're going to share some general findings, really focused around products that have helped me or individuals adapt to life with COVID. And then we're going to dive into two areas in particular, where there was just an enormous amount of experimentation. One we're calling the new household supply chain. And the second is really focused on rich human connection. And then we'll wrap up. If you stick around to the end you'll have a chance to weigh in on what we do next, in terms of our ongoing research efforts, and then we'll have, hopefully, plenty of time for Q&A from you all.

Michael Winnick:
So, when COVID first started heating up, I think, like so many people, we felt a need to do something. Unfortunately, we couldn't make N95 masks, we couldn't have major impacts in terms of PPE, but we felt like we could do something and that thing that we could do was use really our platform and our tools to understand how people's everyday lives were being impacted and affected, and to give them a chance to tell their stories, and then to try to make sense of the experiences that they were having. And that kind of really hit home for us that not only do people, and you'll see these in some of the examples, appreciate getting paid a little bit and having a chance to kind of earn a little pocket change as they're sitting at home. I think there are definitely needs for people to really be able to share these experiences and have some kind of outlet to try to make sense of the experiences that they're going through.

Michael Winnick:
And to do that, you'll see that we used kind of the newest research technique at dscout called Express Missions. And what these kind of look like is kind of quali/quant hybrid, where we went out to typically around 900 people for each wave of this research and we're sharing the third wave from you, there are two others, which is a combination of closed-ended questions, a few open-ends, and videos. And so this was a really efficient way for us to run fairly quick research with a wide number of users. And the key for this methodology, as you'll see, is that you get effectively a little bit from a wide range of people right, so we can sample a much broader range than the traditional diary study on dscout when we tend to go deep with smaller number of participants.

Michael Winnick:
So that will be the focus, and you might have some questions that come up, that would be very particular, and the answer would be, well, this methodology isn't optimized for that so we would do typically a diary study for follow-up. So you're going to see kind of a pretty broad-stroke story here, but I think we're continually excited to see what we can still glean from kind of this method. So, we'll dive into a little bit of backstory on COVID diaries so the first wave really launched, right, as I said when COVID started to heat up, and we were really looking at just having people share moments and stories when they really understood the impact of what was going on. So we're just going to share just a few of those, I think Ben's going to share a link too, I think we had 45 stories, so much more detail.

Michael Winnick:
So there was Laura's story about that first time of awkward interacting strangers which now almost has become commonplace but at the time was such a kind of odd moment of like, "Huh. This is really different." And the next story is much more kind of dramatic and that's Adwoa whose mother died right before COVID started heating up and she effectively had to make the decision to leave and not attend her mother's funeral over concerns around being immunocompromised. So stories like this really, I think, set the tone for what is really going on in people's lives. Lastly, we just have this incredibly kind of moving portrait of this change in a religious shift ceremony that Jodi shared with us at the Heritage Baptist Church in Picayune, Mississippi, where she kind of told this just moving story of this incredibly unusual drive-in service where everyone was praying from the safety of their own cars, right and so there's just this kind of really rich picture to describe how different life really was.

Michael Winnick:
So wave two, which was approximately two weeks after wave one, we shifted gears in terms of the focus of this Express Mission, and we focused more on coping strategies and so we were curious what people were doing to cope and how they kind of shared their own coping strategies? We would get a lot of high-level pieces and so we tagged all of that data and information. And we really kind of saw these six coping strategies, and these are roughly an order of frequency. So, really keen on adopting mindfulness rituals, whether these are positive messages to oneself or meditating; a focus on exercise, getting outside, moving around; really seeking to keep busy, whether that's through work, or doing various activities and projects at home; keen on seeking real connection, in terms of interacting with others, especially if you're isolated. A sense of vigilance and keeping your guard up, staying effectively vigilant to stay safe. And then lastly; if you fail at the other five coping strategies, a real focus on self-forgiveness and it's okay to binge-watch, take care of yourself, entertain, do what you got to do to get through this.

Michael Winnick:
So, the research we're sharing today is from the third wave, which was run in mid-April. It's taken us a few days longer each wave to actually make sense of the data, I think we are getting tired. So we're a few days beyond where we shared the last round of this. And this, again, was focused using an Express Mission, but the kind of key line of questioning we're really focused on today, Jaymie will kind of pop it up here, is really focused on looking at having people share products, services, websites, and apps that have helped them adapt to tdhe COVID world. And so we did a little technique which I like to call a speed bump, where we kind of told people a message, and then we ask them to really think about it, write it down, so we'd kind of get good thinking and not just exactly what's first in their minds. And then we had them list out five to 10 specific companies or brand names.

Michael Winnick:
After that, we had been picked the one that helped them adapt the most, and then they shared a video about that and then we asked them a few questions around their sense of whether this is a service they would continue to use when "Things went back to normal." That's really the focus of what we're going to share today. So we got some amazing lists, I love reading these lists. I have done it for hours and hours and days, but I probably could do it for some more. There's Bella's list which I think is the classic 14-year-old or teen list, I'm sure many of you have kids, I know I do, whose lists look very similar to this. RK's list is just a great example of the, I would guess I'd say, randomness or heterogeneity of what came back, right? Anything from Zoom to Girl Scout cookies to nail polish to a ukulele, right, so a lot of diversity.

Michael Winnick:
And then of course, Jacob's list is special in a particular sense, which is I love that he has called out two brands of donuts Dunkin Donuts and Krispy Kreme, not just donuts in general, we got to have two types. And then, of course, Jack Daniel's and Jim Beam, right? So real good focus on the bourbon and donuts, key things to get us through. And then Katherine shares another list which is headlined by alcohol, wine and scotch, right, a kind of more classic list. And Katherine has a great video which we'll share now which kind of gives you a sense of when people picked one thing that they were really focusing on, kind of what they shared about that.

Katherine:
Thank you wine. Thank you for being the little treat I give myself at the end of the day, after being a teacher that I never expected to be, being home-bound that I never expected to be, having my husband here all the time that I never expected to have. Thank you for being the little thing that I give myself a glass of every night. Thank you.

Jaymie Wahlen:
So apologies if you hear the sounds of Chicago, my neighbors are very enthusiastic honkers, so if that happens again, just know that you're getting a taste of our life here in Chicago. As Michael said, we ended up with over 900 lists. And, on average, these had just short of six items, companies, products, services. We used some data science to clean and combine these responses, some list items were mentioned many, many times and most of them were mentioned only one or two times. So as you can see, there's a very long tail. That's not to say that the items in the long tail aren't valuable when we look at them holistically, they tell a really interesting story. So we'll get into that but as we start looking at the left-hand side of the curve, the items that were mentioned multiple times, probably not too surprising. Lots of large tech, retail, and some disruptors in there. We see, Amazon, Walmart, Target, Netflix, YouTube, and then, of course, kind of social networking and communication tools like Zoom, Instagram, Facebook, TikTok.

Jaymie Wahlen:
When people explain why these are valuable to them, there is something that's a little bit surprising and it stood out to us loud and clear. And that is this evidence of massive experimentation. And it dawned on us pretty early on, I guess it dawned on Michael, that we have this opportunity to tap into what feels like the largest deprivation study ever conducted. And a deprivation study is something that might traditionally be asking someone to not use their phone for a week, their smartphone, or something else that's very typical for their life and see what changes. It's a nice way to tap into experiences or preferences that might otherwise be buried in routinized behaviors, but they're hard to pull off. So, we were lucky in that we had all of a sudden these conditions to see what happens when people are deprived of leaving home and seeing the people in their lives.

Jaymie Wahlen:
So what happens when people are deprived of that? What we see is experimentation and just some incredible adaptation, a whole number of new solutions, and first-time user experiences, just a handful of them that you can see on your screen now that represent all the sort of, "I never", moments in the research. Experimentation happened really across the board with each age group, but there are some distinctions. So, these are the top 10 lists for each age group, and you can see the folks under the age of 30 are pretty reliant on communication and social networking tools that help them feel connected, Zoom, YouTube, Netflix, connected, and entertaining. While when we get to the 30-plus-year-olds, you can see there's a healthier mix of utilities, logistics, the things required to keep your home stocked and operating in addition to connection and entertainment.

Jaymie Wahlen:
So when we kind of double-tap into the 50-plus, it's a especially interesting group to look at because we might think of these folks as being slow tech adopters or laggards, but sure enough we saw them praising TikTok and Zoom and Houseparty for helping them in this time. My 96-year-old grandmother is playing bridge online with her sisters-in-law for hours every day and she is using Facebook Messenger to talk to my six-year-old niece, and they are separated by 90 years and a Canadian border that is very real and closed, and they can stay connected because my grandma's able to adapt. I'm very impressed by her. And so it's just interesting because we see sort of this forced catch up happening, and COVID is putting pressure on any digital divide that may have existed. If you have access to digital tools and connectivity, we see people that might not otherwise have been inclined to try new things and experiment.

Jaymie Wahlen:
So as Michael mentioned, we explored coping strategies in our second wave of covert research. And so in this way we got to see more about the tools and apps that people are using to support those coping strategies. So from mindfulness tools like Headspace and Calm, the Calm app, to get moving people are using the Nike Run Club app and Peloton, Fitbit, YouTube. For forgive yourself this escapism and treat yourself, we obviously see a lot of media and Netflix, YouTube, Nintendo Switch came up a whole lot. To keep busy, of course, people are adapting with work through Microsoft Teams and Google Classroom but they're also learning new things and staying busy personally with Duolingo, Pinterest, YouTube. Seeking real connection, this is a major topic we'll dig into today in just a moment. Some obvious tools there that were major on people's lists. And then lastly this vigilance for protecting yourself and your family from the virus, we saw a lot of trusted sources, ranging from the CDC and CNN to Facebook News, as well as practical protection like Lysol or even Instacart is listed as something that helps people feel safe and protected.

Jaymie Wahlen:
So we're going to dive into two areas of experimentation. One we're calling the new household supply chain. And then the second which is all about deep human connection, and these are just two of many themes that stood out to us among different behavior change that's happening right now. But the reason that we're focusing on these is that they're the areas where the deprivation really seemed to hit home. And as a result, we see more extreme and, in my opinion, interesting compensating behaviors and new-user experiences. Yes. There are interesting things happening with media and entertainment, but for the most part just a leveling up, it's people are streaming more. Here we see shifts. Shifts in preferences and value sets in what people are willing to try and adopt.

Jaymie Wahlen:
So, again, a nod back to our first wave of COVID research, which kicked off in March. There was this sense of, sort of shock and fear when it came to stocking your home. And for Brenda here at home when she made an early morning strategic trip to Trader Joe's and still found a line around the block, she was shocked. Laura echoed this when she went to the store and saw empty shelves, she was shocked that that could happen in America and that people could be hoarding. This shock and fear was super prevalent. Now, the need to keep your home stocked is equally as top of mind, equally as important, but we don't see the same level of, kind of fear or shock. People are adapting, so they've kind of pieced together these new supply chains, various services that you see on your screen now, that depend on what you need. So is it prepared food, is it groceries, is it prescriptions, is it craft supplies or a bike tool, how immediately do you need this and how comfortable are you taking risks going to traditional stores?

Jaymie Wahlen:
So, people seem to trust that they can get what they need. And a lot of what we're talking about in the new supply chain is food, it's pretty central. We do hear about other things, but food is pretty major. And one thing that stood out was sort of this way that eating out is now carry out. And having food from a restaurant is still a treat and still feels special. It's a thing that some people save for the weekend, or save for a night when they just really need a break from dishes or from having to think about what to put on the table yet again. That was kind of interesting to see. But across the board, you just see a lot of adaptation to get people to this point where they trust that they can get what they need. So let's hear from some of our Scouts about this new households supply chain.

Speaker 5:
Thank you, Amazon. You have made it so easy to cope during this crisis.

Speaker 6:
I would like to say thank you to HelloFresh.

Speaker 7:
Thank you so much Target in-store Pickup.

Speaker 8:
Hey, DoorDash. Thank you.

Speaker 9:
Thank you Instacart.

Speaker 10:
Instacart.

Speaker 11:
Postmates.

Speaker 12:
Costco.

Speaker 33:
Hey, Peapod.

Speaker 13:
Thank you, DoorDash.

Speaker 14:
Who would have thought simple thing like milk delivery to your front door would be life-changing?

Speaker 15:
Well, if it wasn't for Amazon, I think I would be losing my mind.

Speaker 16:
I never shop on Amazon before this.

Speaker 17:
I've used Amazon now to buy some pretty non-essential item.

Speaker 18:
I appreciate your relationship with Whole Foods, Amazon.

Speaker 19:
I've got to say, we were on the fence about grocery delivery services.

Speaker 20:
Thank you, Peapod.

Speaker 33:
I did have to wake up quite early for a few days to try to get an appointment.

Speaker 22:
Sorry for my voice. I'm sick. But I want to say thank you to Walmart because you make it so easy to buy groceries when we can't go anywhere.

Speaker 23:
Thank you Walmart Pickup app.

Speaker 24:
Things are going to be okay because Walmart is still open and still there.

Speaker 23:
I can park my car and other people can put groceries in my car and I think that's crazy.

Speaker 26:
Thank you, DoorDash.

Speaker 27:
Thank you, Grubhub.

Speaker 13:
I don't cook.

Speaker 29:
Prior to COVID-19, I didn't even use DoorDash because I thought having fast food delivered to your house was a waste of time.

Speaker 13:
You bring my coffee in the morning when I wake up. You bring my Firehouse Subs or McDonald's in the evening.

Speaker 8:
I'm giving back to restaurants who are likely in need.

Speaker 31:
Thank you to Amazon, more for the employees that work at Amazon.

Speaker 9:
I really appreciate all of the workers that are risking their lives.

Speaker 32:
They are being put at risk for taking care of the rest of us.

Jaymie Wahlen:
So you can hear a couple things in that video. A few things stand out to me and that's just this idea of experimentation and shifting value sets. "I never would have had fast food delivered and now it's a treat." "I never used grocery delivery but now I would." And also gratitude. Gratitude to the companies and gratitude to the workers. And I should shout out to the dscout Media view, it's one of our newer features which allows you to create reels like that, right in the platform where you can edit from the transcript. It was a real time-saver for me and Michael as this was sort of our passion project. I was telling my husband this is my hobby is doing the COVID Diaries. It's our weekend project, so some time-saving tools in there were really appreciated.

Jaymie Wahlen:
So when we dig into why people really appreciate these companies, why they made it on their top lists, it's usually a mix of these three elements. Being quick to adapt and meet customer needs in this changing time; supporting those in need, whether it's healthcare workers or high-risk individuals, and then just being especially vigilant and attentive to safety needs right now. So we saw examples, including special hours for healthcare workers and the elderly, contactless delivery, rolling out those features quickly, people really admired. And then also prioritizing essential items over non-essential items, people know when they're buying a non-essential item and they appreciate someone kind of balancing the scales there. And I'd call out that it seems like all three of these and certainly the intersection of these threes is ripe for innovation and differentiation, people are hyper-aware and they're evaluating products and services based on elements like these that may not have been a factor weeks ago.

Ben Wiedmaier:
Jaymie, may I interject for a second?

Jaymie Wahlen:
Please.

Ben Wiedmaier:
Hey you all. It's Ben. Sorry. We have a good question from Radhika that you don't need to get to just now but as you're about to go into the supply chain side of this, Radhika asks, "Will people who started food delivery during COVID continue to use these services? I know that you and Michael were looking at and thinking about some of the new services and tools and experiences that folks were using. Do you have a sense as to which ones will be more likely to stick? Now, I know that this assumes that we'll go back to normal which most experts think won't happen, but if at some point during this presentation you could speculate on what you saw from folks might suggest how they're going to adopt or continue using these in the future." Thanks for the question, Radhika. And thank you, Jaymie and Michael.

Jaymie Wahlen:
Yeah. Thanks Radhika, that's a good question. We have a slide about that coming up shortly. I'll invite Michael to expand on that too. So, we'll certainly get to that. So, we saw that there are certain complexities or friction points in this new supply chain, and they really center around these moments of human interaction, the human moments. So, when you are ordering for others, whether it's an elderly parent or a college student. It's not easy to figure out what you want, figure out scheduling, coordinate. Scheduling, even for yourself, can be difficult. Windows are limited, especially now and so people describe having to wake up early, coordinate, shift their schedule to make it work.

Jaymie Wahlen:
Similarly, substitutions are always going to be a reality in restaurant or grocery delivery, but even more so now when some availability is less consistent. So that underscores the need for attentive, smart shoppers who are going to be communicative and make good choices about what to substitute whatnot. And then that need for good shopper communication also extends to drop off and coordinating timing. And while contactless delivery was certainly a selling point and something that people really appreciated, the experience really doesn't stop at contactless delivery, people describe this new decontamination period where you need to figure out what needs to be cleaned or you're questioning what should be unpacked and thrown away. So that also appears to be an opportunity for innovation. But again, the human element of all this is so important, having people who are certainly essential workers that are essential to these workflows and essential to these new supply chains.

Jaymie Wahlen:
So, we heard that in the video, this deep appreciation and care for people who make this new supply chain possible. And we also heard that it seems people are evaluating the companies that they choose to patronize by how they're treating doctors. They're evaluating if folks are getting the proper care and access to resources that help keep them safe and make it worth their time. We were fortunate enough to hear from a number of these essential workers on the new front lines so shoppers, drivers, box packers. For the most part, they really are grateful for the work, but they certainly also appreciate things that keep them safe.

Jaymie Wahlen:
So, again, great question from Radhika. The participants generally do say that they will continue using services, and this is filtered down to the products and services that we considered to be these logistical, new supply chain services. And so you can see 82%, the vast majority, said they are very likely to continue using after things go back to normal. Now some question if there is a back to normal so of course they'll continue using it if things don't go back to normal. And the reasons that they would hope to continue using it would just be situational in moments of convenience where they choose to not put their shoes on and they choose to have a relaxing evening, but not that they have to.

Jaymie Wahlen:
So, in the moments where they say they're not going to continue using a service, it tends to be, I think, coming back more to experiences that they want. So if it's the experience of shopping in a traditional retail store where you can see just how fresh those vegetables are or discover a new product or get a sample, those sorts of things might contribute to a drive to use traditional retail. Also, just the experience of dining out, I think people express that that's still valuable to them. And of course, the fees, wanting to save some money in the future is an element of why someone wouldn't continue using these services. Michael, would you add anything to that, to Radhika's question?

Michael Winnick:
Not really. I mean, I think that this kind of speaks to the particular question pretty well. I would just add I think in general, this is a big question I think that we're all trying to wonder which is, "How do things reset and kind of what does return to normal and what sticks and what doesn't?" And I think the kind of the metaphor that I have been thinking about through this research, and we'll certainly talk about this with rich human connection, is this idea that if kind of everyday life was on a shoreline, COVID really has kind of flooded everyday life and certainly changed it in so many dramatic ways.

Michael Winnick:
But that that water line will reset at some point, but we will see a lot of the residue of these behaviors sticking around. That may not be so extreme like, "I will never go to the grocery store again," but the idea that, "Hey. Now, if I don't feel well or I just don't feel like putting on my clothes on or getting stuff or I just need a few things, I'm just going to order kind of pick up," and I think that idea is in that kind of basic sense that I know how to do these things right now, these are routes that have been cut in my life, I know how to work them. I think you're going to see the continued adoption and use of these things well past kind of the crisis moments that we're all in.

Jaymie Wahlen:
It's a great metaphor. I like the shoreline and the residue. Michael [crosstalk 00:31:04] is master of a metaphor.

Michael Winnick:
It's good. [crosstalk 00:31:04] flooding in Chicago right now, so it could be a metaphor for what's going on in our world. So. Okay. Great. So I'm going to kind of run through this whole idea of virtual rich human connection and kind of something I think that we all intuitively know is a major topic in our lives. And certainly has been the case in our research in part two, or wave two, of the COVID Diaries. We spent time kind of talking through this in a fair bit of detail, and we shared a couple of coping strategies that people had.

Michael Winnick:
And I'd say the key stories were really focused on intentionality of communication. This seemed especially true for people that felt isolated and kind of the idea that "I need to make plans. I need to commit to regular interactions with others." And certainly, the more that they would take place in a video, the better to get some replication of kind of real-world interaction with others. We also saw in part two, and we'll certainly talk about this, this idea of moving from talking and just talking about stuff to doing stuff together. Whether that's having drinks, whether that's effectively happy hours, playing games, that there's this kind of focus and shift in focus from we can use effectively video tools not simply for talking but there's this more active sense of how we can use them.

Michael Winnick:
And of course, we do have to talk about Zoom. I'm sure that we all know the Zoom stories very well at this point, but we put together just a quick list of things our participants have told us that they've done via Zoom, and I think it really underlines this point I just made about the level of activity that is going on, whether that is religious celebrations, church youth groups, lots of exercise classes, lessons of all kinds, assemblies, therapy, AA meetings, and the Seattle Puzzler Facebook Group meeting, right? There's just all sorts of group behaviors that are basically being reconstituted in this kind of basically, new forum, right? And so Zoom appeared on 32% of all lists, and it was the number one most appreciated. We asked people pick one tool that's help them adapt the most, Zoom was picked number one, and it was twice as many basically selections as anything else on the list. Amazon was in second with 7%. So we're going to watch a video a few people talking about Zoom.

Speaker 34:
Thank you to Zoom who I hadn't even heard of before this. I bet you're doing really well.

Speaker 35:
Zoom. Zoom. Zoom.

Speaker 36:
We didn't even date before and now I'm literally almost in bed with you.

Speaker 37:
It has very literally changed my world.

Speaker 39:
One of my family members is literally on Zoom right now talking to all of my family members.

Speaker 40:
I haven't physically seen my children in three weeks. Hooked up to Zoom. Saw them two days ago and I plan to see them real soon through Zoom.

Speaker 34:
Help my kids log on and do dance lessons, to connect with other kids in our church youth group.

Speaker 42:
Dance studio has linked my kids, even my son's soccer team.

Speaker 43:
Having all my golf girls on Zoom at the same time.

Speaker 44:
... And have a conversation as if we were sitting in her living room,

Speaker 35:
We actually have a weekly conference call with our family. Huh. Did we ever talk to them before? Not really.

Speaker 45:
Thank you for bringing my education to me every single day.

Speaker 46:
You're the reason that I'm able to continue to work with my students so that they don't miss a beat.

Speaker 47:
I find it to be a little more user friendly and have more options.

Speaker 48:
I've never had an issue with it.

Speaker 49:
I mean, I have other options. Skype and many of its competitors. But Zoom has been so easy. It's got the word out and everyone's already downloaded it.

Speaker 48:
If my mum can use it then boy, you did a great job.

Jeffrey:
People in my life who've never done a video conference before, ever, and are technologically illiterate it's simple enough that they can learn how to use you, but being robust enough that I can use you for business.

Speaker 51:
I am one of the people who have COVID-19. Yep. This is what you look like after 10 days, totally exhausted. But I'd like to thank Zoom for bringing our family together.

Speaker 43:
And I know now it sounds sort of cliche, but at the end of the day, it is what it is so much helping me get through this time.

Michael Winnick:
Okay. So I think just a summary of themes you already heard in there and we'll move on, don't worry, beyond Zoom and some other kind of things going on in the space, which is, I think you heard in the video, there's such a focus. Zoom has kind of become the default choice, in our opinion, for a couple reasons. One is the sense that it's just incredibly easy to use, and that effectively anyone can use it, right? And I think you can see just some of the Scout quotes from people that thought technology would be intimidating but they think that it's actually pretty easy to use themselves, as well as people that are responsible for shepherding others into kind of these video conferencing experiences, the sense that they can simply get people on board easily.

Michael Winnick:
And then, I think, a particular call out to... we have a lot of Scouts that are teachers and obviously a lot of Scouts that are students and so there was a heavy educational kind of component to comments around Zoom, and it's really clear, you can see from this kind of quote on the right that Zoom did a tremendous job of reaching out the school districts very early. That was a marketing stroke of genius. In terms of kind of really quickly developing kind of usage and opportunities in COVID. It's also interesting to hear teachers talk about special features and I think this is something we'll talk about in terms of impacts going forward, the way they're using Zoom features in special ways that are kind of more appropriate for teaching, right. So, we heard teachers talking about the use of breakout rooms, and we know that people like these in business meetings but when you're a teacher, this kind of gives you the way that recreates small tables in your classroom. You can kind of go around and visit people working and kind of have a more personal check-in with your students.

Michael Winnick:
Virtual backgrounds, how many silly things have you seen in business meetings of people putting you know themselves in outer space or on an island or right so but for teachers actually, it's really important, it creates a sense of privacy. It gives them a way to separate what's going on at home and their home world from their students and vice versa for students as well, gives them a way to basically say I don't want to show people my room or where I spend my time or maybe they're self-conscious about something and so I think it's really interesting to see how these features are being reworked. Remote mute mics, we have a scout who is a Pre-K teacher and she talks about getting her little ones on Zoom, I was wishing we could get footage of that but there are various laws and regulations preventing that. Probably be adorable. But how much she has to be able to remote mute and unmute mics to ensure that there's some semblance of not complete chaos in her classroom, right? And so I think this is really interesting to us as we look at how these products and services are going to shift and change as there are additionally new use cases.

Michael Winnick:
So that brings us to our next slide, which is this the number of jobs to be done for rich human communication is incredibly vast and what we see in evidence in some of the lists is that people are starting to really specialize and take different tools to handle kind of different optimizations of these sorts of factors, whether it's the size of the group, it's the length of time, the engagement style of whether it's something that's planned or impromptu or synchronous or asynchronous and the amount of engagement. People are kind of creating routes through this to kind of optimize with particular tools. So, for instance, while Zoom is probably pretty good for one to five and up for 30 minutes or planned, it's probably not the best tool for just an impromptu check-in.

Michael Winnick:
What we see for instance with teens, is there's a tremendous amount of focus on FaceTime as a solution, and in particular, it's for one to one very long haul interactions, where you might actually spend four or five hours with a friend. It's probably a little bit more impromptu and oddly enough, the level of engagement is kind of medium, it's almost like you're just sitting there in the same video space with each other. You're not even necessarily heavily interacting in that. Another tool which was mentioned a few times by Scouts is Marco Polo, this is very similar to things people also mentioned around WhatsApp, where you might have a group of five to 10 friends, and you just want to do a quick video message back and forth with them so it's kind of quick, it's impromptu and relatively low engagement. We could probably map many other tools onto a framework like this but I think the main point here is that there are so many jobs to be done in this area and that it's very likely that participants are going to have a wide array of tools to handle specific combinations of these jobs.

Michael Winnick:
And that doesn't even include the next overlay which is how important activity is when fits into this matrix and so what we're kind of seeing is this rich human connection really becoming a layer across so many other needs and use cases. We talked about get moving, right now Zoom is almost the default for group exercise classes. Peloton, though, a lot of what people talk about in Peloton is creating that sense of human connection, creating a sense that they're not alone. So you can think about how much that will change over time and keeping busy, obviously, there's more business-oriented tools like Teams and Meet. Of course these are also being used in school settings and probably in personal settings as well. And then there's a lot of opportunity and innovation in what we marked as forgive yourself but really, there's a lot of entertainment kind of needs in this category, whether that's things like Netflix Party, Discord, Twitch which are more gaming-oriented. We're going to spend a minute talking about Houseparty because I think it's a good harbinger of things to come.

Michael Winnick:
For those of you who don't know Houseparty, Houseparty is an app that has been around for quite a while. I think it started out as Meerkat, a long time ago, went through a name change, a change in ownership and is now owned by Epic Games, which is the creator of Fortnight, which is where my son spends all of his time of virtually, and they've done something really interesting with Houseparty that a few of our participants commented on. If you noticed, Houseparty kind of snuck into that list of Top 30, which is a pretty hard place to be. So, and what they've done is they've kind of really integrated this gaming layer directly into the experience and so what participants noted was, "This is great. We can get on line and we can go do something together. We don't just have to kind of stare at each other's faces and come up with things to talk about." And so, we expect to see much more things like this, more activity layers. Actually, Spotify announced a co-listening service today, right. So this idea of doing things together, virtually, we think is an area that you're going to see a lot of innovation and development amongst our customers and probably people like you are working on this.

Michael Winnick:
A lot more looking at things like Advanced Camera functionalities for sensing things, you're going to see a lot of exercise classes or piano lessons, you can bet there's going to be ways to analyze your form, provide suggestions and enable teachers to have basically a more effective pedagogy, when they're in a remote setting. And then lastly, I think something that I know as a leader of a company I'd love to understand, which is ways to assess activity and engagement for remote participants. Who's tuning in, who's tuned out, right? So you can imagine these sorts of questions that would probably be great to do as a creator of a webinar right now and see how closely you all are paying attention, right? So those sorts of things we think are the sorts of innovations you're going to start seeing kind of much more heavily that we can just see from this data in this study.

Michael Winnick:
Same kind of comment goes here, there was a little more equivocation about how often people would use these services when things "Got back to normal," versus the supply chain. But I think it was pretty clear that participants do expect these to be part of their new normal, but hopefully not their sole source of human interaction, right. So we're obviously in a very extreme zone. Again, very similar themes here, "Now that I see how easy that is, now that I figured this out, why wouldn't I do this more?" It's also gone from something we would never do or would very rarely do with a remote friend, to something that is now a default way of interacting with remote friends. There's a general sense that that will likely continue. On the other side, Scouts are a little skeptical that this back to normal thing will happen. So there's a general feeling of like, "We're just going to be doing this for so long it's going to become an ingrained behavior."

Michael Winnick:
The one group that really saw it as very temporary, oddly enough, were our youngest participants who really saw these tools as something that is primarily about remote school and they really don't want to just be in remote school. So for their sense, they're going to stop using things like Zoom and Microsoft Classroom when school goes back to normal, and they won't have a need for them. So, as mentioned, we probably could have had a webinar twice as long and added many more areas of experimentation, there's really interesting things going on in fitness, mental health, so many areas, I think, where people are kind of experimenting with things. But we picked these two because they seem the most salient to Jaymie's comments and kind of most tied to this challenge around deprivation.

Michael Winnick:
We just really want to thank our participants. I think you can see this in their videos, but I think every time we get and dig into our research, there's a real profound gratitude I think from the dscout team with people's willingness to share and be open with what's going on in their lives. The humor, the kind of the sadness, the challenges, just a tremendous openness that we really appreciate. Okay. So we'll definitely get a few questions, and as people are putting in these questions I think we're also going to ask you all, in terms of where we want to go next. We want to thank you for obviously taking your time with us and kind of taking time to kind of look at this research. We have subsequent waves of research that we'd love to share with our customers and friends of dscout. And we have a couple of studies that we have all the data for, we just need to dig in and do the analyzing, so we're curious, we'd love for you to vote. We have a lot of work that we've collected on contact tracing and people's openness around contact tracing, and how they think about contact tracing and kind of the general acts of kind of, "Returning kind of into the world."

Michael Winnick:
So that's number one and number two is prior to COVID, we did a massive study on TikTok which involved over 8,000 teens and TikTok, I'd say, has become an even more essential tool now, in COVID, as it's really become a key part of the way that teens are coping and interacting with each other through this incredible period of time. So, if you have a preference for one on the other, please vote it will help us pick where we want to go. And then, lastly, if there's a particular thing you're curious about that you think would be broadly relevant to dscout customers, we'd love to hear it. We are very flexible in terms of how we want to kind of take this research next, so please drop in your research questions into the chat. And then I think we have a little time for Q&A and please, please vote on our poll. Okay.

Ben Wiedmaier:
Thanks, Michael. We do have I mean, it's off to the races. Right now we've got 64% of folks interested in contract tracing to 36%. I mean, this is what I was born to do, reading polls in real life.

Michael Winnick:
Ben, you're biasing the data by telling people the results before it's ready, man. Come on.

Ben Wiedmaier:
Okay. Super quick story. So as a high schooler, I was asked to do The Price is Right game show in high school, having never seen a show and I gave away the Showcase Showdown price because I didn't know that you weren't supposed to tell them the price, and so the whole audience was like, "Wait!" And so they had to split the Showcase between the two audience members.

Michael Winnick:
[inaudible 00:48:57].

Ben Wiedmaier:
So, classic man, I've been blowing it since high school. Thank you so very much to Michael and Jaymie. We have a few questions. One of them that has been popping up a few times is about integrations between these services. Are you noticing anything, or can you make recommendations for a researcher or thinker out there, should they go in the sort of all-encompassing like Microsoft Teams v slack or Zoom v Skype or should they be working at integrations? Are Scouts saying anything about they are more likely to use apps that play nicely with others?

Michael Winnick:
I don't think there is a specific mention of that, that's probably one of those like, "Oh. Good thing to do in a detailed, deep-dive study," but I think that what you see a little bit is this idea of that, I mean, I think our expectation is things like Zoom and probably Hangouts and a few of these other tools are going to become more platform-ish in the sense that there will be... Zoom already has a very active API developer community, but I don't know how heavily integrated into the experience they are yet.

Michael Winnick:
And so I think that this question of if you're going to make, let's say the ultimate yoga classes, service or tool, I think, in front of you is the question do you build that on top of Zoom where you have an installed base and people that know how to use the service, or do you want to build your own tool and suite using kind of more of a technology provider, and having more control of that experience. I think you're going to see both, my sense is you're going to see a lot of people trying to take advantage of the platforming of these products and services.

Jaymie Wahlen:
And I think that the experimentation that we see is a perfect invitation for research because people are doing these compensating behaviors themselves. They are combining Google forms with Zoom to do trivia, right? They're doing all sorts of experimentation, so if you want to see what people are valuing, the features of the value from different services, it's a great way to see how are you currently doing this and then what might make it easier? Or what are you content kind of hacking on your own?

Ben Wiedmaier:
That's great. We have a question from Katie about either your decision to remove from or that you didn't see a lot of healthcare and finance. "Were there any apps like mint? I know my mom is immunocompromised and has season allergies pretty regularly and she's been doing a lot of telemedicine visits. Did you see anything like that pop up on listed services or experiences folks are relying on?" Great question, Katie.

Michael Winnick:
Jaymie, I'm going to take that first?

Jaymie Wahlen:
Sure.

Michael Winnick:
Yeah. We saw some mentions of that. Certainly, I think telemedicine came up a fair number of times amongst participants being able to virtually obviously talk to their doctors or do check-ins. I think MyCharts, which is a Epic product, was probably came up somewhere in the top 50 or so, so it was fairly high up there. Again, this was a very steep curve in terms of things that were frequently mentioned, so there was some evidence of that. Not a preponderance, and I think the other challenge there is it was kind of split up amongst a number of different tools and services, so there was a lot more fragmentation. So we did see that.

Michael Winnick:
In terms of finances, there were definitely a focus on people figuring out a little less how to manage their finances, although banking apps and banking services showed up for sure. There was also a lot of focus on, "How can I make a little bit of money now?" Job sites, unemployment sites, and so that was a that was an area, but I think it kind of got washed out by these kind of more dominant things people are relying on for adapting or kind of coping with COVID. So. There was also a quick question about compensation. One of the fun things about Express Missions is we actually compensated the people, was it Jaymie $2? $1? $1 for each one of their responses. So it's a very kind of-

Jaymie Wahlen:
[crosstalk 00:53:05] too.

Michael Winnick:
What was that?

Jaymie Wahlen:
We have be doing more but $1 is if you keep it pretty brief. Most-

Michael Winnick:
Yeah. But these are low compensation, relatively rapidly run research studies, and then typically what we would do is poll. Let's say we really did want to understand healthcare and finance, we'd probably poll a set of people that said either they're having health struggles or do specific screening questions, you can even do that in Express. We'd poll them into a Diary study or into dscout live and do much more in-depth, kind of research and understanding about what's going on then.

Ben Wiedmaier:
That's great. I forget that Jaymie and Michael can see, like I have some kind of sort of secret access to the Q&A list. You all can see what I can see, of course. Thank you, Katie, again, for those questions. Did you all hear anything about accommodations being made for not just terms of accessibility but did folks mentioned things like, "I'm finding myself using X tool for work more than I thought I would or Y tool for play more?" Did you see any cross-pollination like, "This tool I typically thought of in terms of the jobs, this is a work tool but now I'm using it in this non-work way?"

Michael Winnick:
Jaymie you want to take that one first?

Jaymie Wahlen:
I was distracted by clearing out my screenshare [crosstalk 00:54:21] kind of things. Good question.

Michael Winnick:
Yeah. I mean. Yeah. I can take this one. Yeah. I'd say that there was actually a lot of interesting mashups of tools being reused and moved into different realms and settings. So prime example is Zoom which was predominantly perceived as a business tool. Teams, Google Hangouts, things like that that were being reworked and reused and so typically we talked about things moving from the consumer side to the business side and not the business side to the consumer side, so there was a little interesting reverse of that business tools kind of becoming kind of more critical for that.

Michael Winnick:
There's also an interesting reuse of tools that are... let's say, Discord which is primarily a kind of tool used for gamers to kind of stay in contact and touch and communicate being reused more for just generally social communication of every kind. So I think we did see a lot of tool retrofitting. And even, I guess, we should mention while we talked about these two areas as separate between kind of rich human connection as well as the new household supply chain, there were even crossovers there, right? So people trying to use Zoom to create a shopping list with their parents, right, those kinds of things, right? So I think that there were even kind of crossovers between kind of those pretty distinct areas. So.

Ben Wiedmaier:
Great. Well, thank you so much Michael and Jaymie. This is really cool work. Again, folks who are still on we will be sending along the deck as well as the recording next week. Thanks again for joining us. And Jaymie Michael, thank you again for some of your time. This is great work and we'll hope to have some more research done on contact tracing. That appears to be the winner of the poll. Sorry. I didn't mean to pre-blow it again. At least we know I can consistently-

Michael Winnick:
[crosstalk 00:56:14] get a request to do both. If anyone has some free time and wants to analyze [crosstalk 00:56:18].

Ben Wiedmaier:
Yes. Julia is like, "I don't want to choose. Just do both." Yeah. Julia, if you have some free time.

Michael Winnick:
Let us know if you have some time to do some analysis. We've got data for days. So.

Ben Wiedmaier:
Cool. Well, thanks everyone. We'll be following-up soon and we'll hope to see you all again very shortly.

Michael Winnick:
Okay.

Ben Wiedmaier:
Thanks folks.

Michael Winnick:
Thank you.

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